Sunday, September 17, 2017

Justice Buried by Patricia Bradley

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Justice Buried
by Patricia Bradley


ISBN-13: 9780800727123
Paperback: 384 pages
Publisher: Revell
Released: Sept. 5, 2017

Source: ebook review copy from the publisher through NetGalley.

Book Description, Modified from Goodreads:
In an effort to get her security consulting business off the ground, Kelsey Allen has been spending a lot of time up in the air, rappelling down buildings and climbing through windows to show business owners their vulnerabilities to thieves.

When she is hired to pose as a conservator at the Pink Palace Museum in order to test their security weaknesses after some artifacts go missing, she's ecstatic. But when her investigative focus turns from theft to murder, Kelsey knows she's out of her league--and possibly in the cross hairs. When blast-from-the-past Detective Brad Hollister is called in to investigate, Kelsey may find that he's the biggest security threat yet . . . to her heart.


My Review:
Justice Buried is a romantic suspense novel. It's the second book in a series, but it works as a stand-alone novel. There was plenty of excitement: breaking into buildings, being shot at, bombs, and more. The suspense came from physical danger to Kelsey, sometimes danger she chose but also that from the murderer.

However, I didn't really understand why Kelsey's employer wanted her to physically break into the buildings after she proved that she could. After proving that she knew what she was talking about, she could have just pointed out the security holes. I was also a little disappointed that the cold case seemed more of an excuse for Brad to talk to her and play bodyguard. Kelsey did more work on that case than he did.

Since the story involved a clue-based mystery, I also wondered why the detectives didn't follow up on obvious questions. For example, they notice that the killer seems able to track Kelsey's movements, but they don't do anything about it (like check for a tracking device). I also wondered why they didn't question some things a certain character said and did as that person was on their suspect list. Basically, the end surprised the characters but didn't surprise me. Still, I liked that Kelsey was very resourceful, and Brad had an interesting dilemma about his girlfriend.

There were no sex scenes or bad language. Overall, I'd recommend this enjoyable, exciting novel.


If you've read this book, what do you think about it? I'd be honored if you wrote your own opinion of the book in the comments.


Excerpt: Read an excerpt using Google Preview.

Friday, September 15, 2017

An Inconvenient Beauty by Kristi Ann Hunter

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An Inconvenient Beauty
by Kristi Ann Hunter


ISBN-13: 9780764218279
Paperback: 384 pages
Publisher: Bethany House Publishers
Released: Sept. 5, 2017

Source: ebook review copy from the publisher through NetGalley.

Book Description, Modified from NetGalley:
Griffith, Duke of Riverton, likes order, logic, and control, and he naturally applies this rational approach to his search for a bride. He's certain Miss Frederica St. Claire is the perfect wife for him, but while Frederica is strangely elusive, he can't seem to stop running into her stunningly beautiful cousin, Miss Isabella Breckenridge.

Isabella should be enjoying her society debut, but with her family in difficult circumstances, her uncle will only help them if she'll use her beauty to assist him in his political aims. Already uncomfortable with this agreement, the more she comes to know Griffith, the more she wishes to be free of her unfortunate obligation.


My Review:
An Inconvenient Beauty is a Christian historical novel set in 1815 in England. It's the fourth book in the series, but it works as a stand-alone novel.

Griffith has spent a year carefully deciding what he wants in a wife. He's decided to chose to love his wife after marrying her rather than risk becoming a bumbling idiot by falling in love before the wedding. The story started with some backstory about his childhood that helps explain his actions. His intended target is in love with someone else, however, and she maneuvers him into spending time with her cousin instead.

Isabella is under orders from her uncle to use her beauty to snare men into wanting to please him to have a chance at her. In return, he has promised to help her poor family out. He's such an untrustworthy man, though, that I never understood why she'd take her chances with him after the first few weeks. As her cousin pointed out, Isabella could select an honorable man that she liked and be honest with him in hopes of an alliance that would help her family long-term. Her cousin rightly pointed out that her response to her suggestion made no sense. Anyway, Griffith has to work to win her by learning what things she likes and figuring out what's holding her back from accepting him. They made a good pair, and courting her helped Griffith to open up to others more.

The Christian theme was about trusting God to work things out rather than trying to control everything thing yourself. There was no sex or bad language. Overall, I'd recommend this enjoyable romance.


If you've read this book, what do you think about it? I'd be honored if you wrote your own opinion of the book in the comments.


Excerpt: Read an excerpt using Google Preview.

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Crazy About Cats by Owen Davey

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Crazy About Cats
by Owen Davey


ISBN-13: 9781911171164
Hardcover: 40 pages
Publisher: Flying Eye Books
Released: Sept. 12, 2017

Source: Review copy from the publisher through Amazon Vine.

Book Description, Modified from Goodreads:
Did you know that the fishing cat has partially webbed paws for catching fish? Or that pumas can leap over 15 feet into trees? There are roughly 38 species of cats today, each one superbly adapted to their environment - whether that be in the rainforest or the desert!


My Review:
Crazy About Cats is a children's nonfiction about big cats. The illustrations were stylized (rather than highly realistic). However, they showed the unique characteristics of the different types of cats (lions, pumas, etc.) so it was still easy to identify the cats. The text talked about things like unique big cat features, their coat patterns, their hunting strategies (fish, hide and pounce, etc.), territory, and roaring. He also had featured cats where he gave more information about some cats that I've never even heard of before (margay, rusty-spotted cat) and some more common types (lion, tiger). Overall, I liked this book and would recommend it.


If you've read this book, what do you think about it? I'd be honored if you wrote your own opinion of the book in the comments.


Sunday, September 10, 2017

Death of a Busybody by George Bellairs

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Death of a Busybody
by George Bellairs


ISBN-13: 9781464207365
Paperback
Publisher: Poisoned Pen Press
Released: Sept. 5, 2017

Source: ebook review copy from the publisher through NetGalley.

Book Description from NetGalley:
Miss Tither, the village busybody, is not the best-loved resident of Hilary Magna. She has made many enemies: bombarding the villagers with religious tracts, berating drunkards, and informing the spouses of cheating partners. Her murder, however, is still a huge shock to the Reverend Ethelred Claplady and his parish.

Inspector Littlejohn’s understanding of country ways makes him Scotland Yard’s first choice for the job. Basing himself at the village inn, Littlejohn works with the local police to investigate what lay behind the murder.

A second death does little to settle the collective nerves of the village, and as events escalate, a strange tale of hidden identities, repressed resentment, religious fervour and financial scams is uncovered. Life in the picturesque village of Hilary Magna proves to be very far from idyllic.


My Review:
Death of a Busybody is a mystery that was originally published in 1942 and is set in England. The characters were described with a humorous touch and village life was described in passing as the detective investigated, so the story had some interest beyond the investigation.

Inspector Littlejohn and the local constable followed up on obvious leads and questioned many people. Inspector Littlejohn slowly uncovered what happened until he was finally able to put it all together. There were clues, and the reader (having more clues) can guess whodunit before the Inspector. But the mystery was more complex than I expected.

There was no sex. There was a minor amount of bad language. Overall, I'd recommend this enjoyable, interesting mystery.


If you've read this book, what do you think about it? I'd be honored if you wrote your own opinion of the book in the comments.


Excerpt: Read an excerpt using Google Preview.

Friday, September 8, 2017

A Tale of Two Kitties by Sofie Kelly

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A Tale of Two Kitties
by Sofie Kelly


ISBN-13: 9780399584572
Hardcover: 336 pages
Publisher: Berkley Prime Crime
Released: Sept. 5, 2017

Source: ARC Review copy from the publisher.

Book Description, Modified from Goodreads:
With a well-placed paw on a keyboard or a pointed stare, librarian Kathleen Paulson's two cats, Hercules and Owen, have helped her to solve cases in the past—so she has learned to trust their instincts. She'll need their help when a twenty-year-old scandal leads to murder.

The arrival of the Janes brothers has the little town of Mayville Heights buzzing. Everyone of a certain age remembers when Victor had an affair with Leo’s wife, who then died in a car accident.

Now it seems the brothers are trying to reconcile, until Kathleen finds Leo dead. The police set their sights on Leo’s son and Kathleen’s good friend Simon, who doesn’t have much of an alibi. To prove her friend innocent, Kathleen will have to dig deep into the town's history—and into her sardine cracker supply, because Owen and Hercules don't work for free


My Review:
A Tale of Two Kitties is a cozy mystery. This is the ninth book in the series. You don't need to read the previous books to understand this one, and this book didn't spoil the mysteries in the previous books. There's also a short story, "A Cat Burgler," included at the back.

I like the heroine because she's nice (as the other characters point out). She's not judgmental, and she cares about people. The cats are intelligent and have cat abilities (disappearing and getting out of places) taken to a magical degree. Their actions drew attention to clues, but mostly they provided humor with their antics.

It's a clue-based puzzle mystery. The heroine is intelligent, knowledgeable, and knows how to ask questions without being pushy or accusing. Whodunit seemed the most likely suspect to me, but I wasn't certain until nearly the end.

There was no sex. There was occasional use of bad language. Overall, I'd recommend this fun mystery.


If you've read this book, what do you think about it? I'd be honored if you wrote your own opinion of the book in the comments.


Excerpt: Read an excerpt using Google Preview.

Sunday, September 3, 2017

Bygone Christmas Brides by Jill Stengl, Tamela Hancock Murray, Gina Welborn

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Bygone Christmas Brides
by Ginny Aiken, Carla Gade, Pamela Griffin, Tamela Hancock Murray, Jill Stengl, Gina Welborn


ISBN-13: 97816832228975
Paperback: 400 pages
Publisher: Barbour Publishing, Inc.
Released: Sept. 1, 2017

Source: ebook review copy from the publisher through NetGalley.

Book Description, Modified from NetGalley:
Light a candle in the window and sit down to a slice of fruitcake as you delight in six 19th Century romances that welcome love at Christmastide. Many traditions held dear today have their roots in the British Isles and have been practiced for over a hundred years.

In these six delightful historical stories, romance is nurtured amidst baking Scottish shortbread and English mince pies, burning the yule log, and hanging kissing boughs. But each couple is also plagued by worries of the day. As Christmastide draws to a close, will faith and love endure for future celebrations?


My Review:
Bygone Christmas Brides is a collection of six Christian romance short stories set in the 1800s in America, England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland. Of course, all where Christmas-themed. There was no sex or bad language.

"A Right, Proper Christmas" by Jill Stengl. Set in 1860's in England. I was mainly interested in this story since it's by Jill Stengl. A low-born ex-soldier feels God's call to preach to those of his class, but no one will teach him theology or even give him a job. He's starving and homeless when a reverend gives him shelter from a storm. He's treated like family. The beautiful daughter has her sights on marrying a well-born local, but she's attracted to our hero's kindness and gentleness. It's a sweet, enjoyable story.

"Lost and Found" by Ginny Aiken. Set in 1870 in Wales. The heroine loves a good, honest man...who works in a coal mine. She's afraid that he'll die in an accident like a relative of hers did. Her fear demands that she stay single rather than marry him and trust God for his safety.

"'Tis the Season" by Carla Gade. Set in 1820 in New Jersey. A carpenter comes to the area to discover what happened to a woman he once cared about. The heroine kisses the hero the first time they meet (for a silly reason and despite her intentions to remain single). The romance was super-fast. And no one would keep horses that panicked every time someone whistles.

"I Saw Three Ships" by Pamela Griffin. Set in mid 1800s in Scotland. The low-born heroine has a sharp tongue, which she uses against the wealthy hero for leaving years ago without saying goodbye to her. They were close friends as children and now have to mend past grievances.

"Colleen of Erin" by Tamela Hancock Murray. Set in 1800s in Ireland. The hero has worked hard to build up his store. The heroine has always had wealth, but she also has a generous heart. She's attracted to the hero, but she won't have him until he learns generosity. I liked the characters, and an angel-type character helps the hero to forgive his lazy father (who abandoned him).

"Mercy Mild" by Gina Welborn. Set in 1868 in New Jersey. The hero, who loves children, is bringing some war-orphans to his home town to be united with their new parents. He also loves the heroine, who was abused by her parents. She refuses to have children for fear that she'll abuse her own children. She, of course, ends up having to temporarily care for a child--who is messy whereas she loves cleanliness and order.


If you've read this book, what do you think about it? I'd be honored if you wrote your own opinion of the book in the comments.


Excerpt: Read an excerpt using Google Preview.

Friday, September 1, 2017

12 Days at Bleakly Manor by Michelle Griep

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12 Days at Bleakly Manor
by Michelle Griep


ISBN-13: 9781683222583
Paperback: 192 pages
Publisher: Barbour Publishing, Inc.
Released: Sept. 1, 2017

Source: ebook review copy from the publisher through NetGalley.

Book Description, Modified from NetGalley:
England, 1851: When Clara Chapman receives an intriguing invitation to spend Christmas at an English manor home, she is hesitant--but if she remains the duration of the twelve-day celebration, she is promised a sum of five hundred pounds. Money that she desperately needs. She's shocked when she encounters one of the other guests—her former fiancĂ©, Benjamin Lane.

Imprisoned unjustly, Ben wants revenge on whoever stole his freedom and future. When he’s given the chance to gain his freedom, he jumps at it—and is faced with Clara, who thinks he's guilty of humiliating her and stealing her family's fortune. Brought together under mysterious circumstances, Clara and Ben discover that what they’ve been striving for isn’t what ultimately matters.


My Review:
12 Days at Bleakly Manor is a romance set in England in late Dec. 1851. Seven strangers are invited to a manor to celebrate the 12 days of Christmas, lured by the promise that they will gain something they desire if they stay all 12 days. The host is missing, but he informs them that only one person will win their prize. Not surprisingly, accidents begin to happen.

Despite the accidents, the story seemed more humorous than suspenseful. The characters were quirky and outrageous. It's implied that at least some of the characters were based off of characters in "Bleak House," but that happens to be one of Dickens' novels that I haven't read. Since I read Charles Dickens for the historical details, I was disappointed that this novel made little effort to be historically accurate in terms of manners and such.

It wasn't difficult to figure out where the overall arc of the story was going--who the "bad persons" were, who would win, etc.-so it was a light, entertaining read. There wasn't much character development, but Ben was faced with a hard choice at the end and Clara had to decide if she'd trust Ben and God again. There was no sex or bad language. Overall, I'd recommend this enjoyable novel.


If you've read this book, what do you think about it? I'd be honored if you wrote your own opinion of the book in the comments.